Black Sabbath - Never Say Die (1978) (Warner Bros Records 1988)

hudební novinky 1988 / music news 1988
Užívateľov profilový obrázok
Horex
Metalový král
Metalový král
Príspevky: 23499
Dátum registrácie: 21 Feb 2013, 19:14
Kontaktovať užívateľa:

Black Sabbath - Never Say Die (1978) (Warner Bros Records 1988)

Príspevokod užívateľa Horex » 09 Nov 2022, 18:54

Black Sabbath - Never Say Die (1978) (Warner Bros Records 1988)

Obrázok

Obrázok

Obrázok

Obrázok

Obrázok

Obrázok

Year : 1978 (Warner Bros Records 1988)
Style : Hard Rock , Heavy Metal
Country : United Kingdom
Audio : 320 kbps + all scans
Size : 125 mb


Bio:

Black Sabbath are generally considered both the first heavy metal and doom metal band. Originally they were called Polka Tulk (featuring a saxophonist and slide guitarist in their line-up) before changing to Earth, a name they had to change again because of confusion with another band of the same name. They may have also went by the name The Earth Blues Company in their pre-Black Sabbath days.Originally, they started as a blues-influenced hard rock group, but as they progressed they added more European folk elements to their sound, a sound that wasn't like any other group during their time. Thus, this was known as heavy metal, and in due time, the band became what is now known as doom metal. Their lyrics dealt with darker issues than most conventional rock as well.Accordingly, the "doom" genre name came from their "Paranoid" release, with the song called "Hand of Doom." Stoner metal is another sub-genre that is a direct descendant from this band.The "Mob Rules" line-up of Tony Iommi, Geezer Butler, Ronnie James Dio and Vinny Appice reunited in 2007. Rather than using the Black Sabbath name (as the original line-up is still officially in place), they were called Heaven and Hell, after the first Dio-era album. Three new tracks were recorded for a compilation album of Dio-era Sabbath material before they officially reformed under the Heaven and Hell name.On May 13th 2006, Black Sabbath were inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame, becoming arguably the first heavy metal band to receive that honor.On November 11, 2011, the original members of Black Sabbath officially announced that they would record a new album and tour again in 2012.On May 19th, 2012, Geezer Butler announced that Tommy Clufetos would be the drummer for the band at three live shows. Original drummer Bill Ward has issued a statement saying that he would not join the reunion because of an "un-signable contract".

Album:

Never Say Die! is the eighth studio album by English rock band Black Sabbath, released in September 1978. It was the last studio album with the band's original lineup and also the last studio album to feature original vocalist Ozzy Osbourne until 13 in 2013. It was certified Gold in the U.S on 7 November 1997[1] and as of November 2011 sold 133,000 copies in the United States since the SoundScan era.Critics called it unbalanced, scattering its energy in too many directions.1978's "Never Say Die!" has the unfortunate connotation (along with 1995's "Forbidden") of being "The worst Black Sabbath album ever". It's easy to see why it gets tagged as such - 1978 was not a great year for Ozzy, Tony, Geezer and Bill, and to say that they were not functional as a band would be a massive understatement. Drugs and booze and apathy had slowly disintegrated them into a flailing morass of a unit, and the musical peaks and artistic integrity they'd achieved with "Sabbath Bloody Sabbath" and "Sabotage" seemed like a dream from another life, rather than just a few short years in the rear view mirror. It seemed as if it was a completely different band, and in some regards, that's probably not far removed from the truth. Ozzy had briefly left the band in 1977 and flirted with the idea of fronting a different project, and even when he returned, it was clear his heart wasn't in it anymore. Tony Iommi had all but become supreme deity in the band due to the fact that somebody needed to steer the ship and nobody else had the capacity to manage it."Never Say Die!" has an end result of being a Sabbath album that's far more reliant on jazz and moderate rock than on the crushing heaviness and scary imagery that Black Sabbath had been known for previously. But Sabbath excelled as musicians no matter what imagery the album may or may not have had and with that understanding, it's not unpleasant.What actually elevates it up from the dung heap is that Tony, Geezer and Bill were (and are to this day) fantastic musicians who excel at pretty much anything they do - so much so that, even when it's bad, it's still rather good. Nobody can argue that "Never Say Die!" lacks the intensity of previous efforts, and is musically a huge departure from the norm, but taken for what it is and not what it should be, it's a remarkably solid album full of consistent, easily listenable and enjoyable performances. Of course, one can also argue that Black Sabbath were never a band above experimenting with different musical styles from "Vol. 4" and beyond, and to that end, "Never Say Die!" certainly follows suit in that fashion.Lyrically, the band offers a lot of different themes here - from looking to the horizon hopefully ("A Hard Road"), cryogenic nightmares ("Shock Wave"), the perspective of an aging dancer ("Air Dance", which features some amazing keyboard work by Don Airey), and a referential song about Ozzy and his at the time recently deceased father ("Junior's Eyes"), there's not a lot of evil themes to be found anywhere. The final tracks, "Breakout" and "Swinging the Chain", are full on jazz themed rockers and a surprising amount of fun to listen to!Understanding that "Never Say Die!" is an appropriate record depicting where Sabbath's mindset was at that time is the first key to enjoying it. Most of the negativity that surrounds the album is maybe understandable to fans who would have liked more along the lines of a "Master of Reality" theme, but the vitriol that gets heaped on this particular outing infers that the musicianship and songwriting is sub-par, when that's certainly not the case. It's actually a step up from "Technical Ecstasy", even if it does follow the same direction as that album.It's an interesting anomaly in the Black Sabbath discography, but it's definitely a benchmark album depicting what was to become a very critical time in their history and it's definitely worth the listen, provided you can take your goggles off. It's of course nowhere near what their first six albums were regarding quality, but it's also nowhere near as awful as some other reviews might lead you to think.

Line-Up:

Ozzy Osbourne Vocals (lead)
Tony Iommi Guitars, Vocals (backing) (track 4)
Geezer Butler Bass, Vocals (backing) (track 4)
Bill Ward Drums, Vocals (lead) (track 9), Vocals (backing) (track 4)

Produced: Black Sabbath
Engineered: Dave Harris
Recorded at Sound Interchange, Toronto, Canada
Additional Players: Don Airey - Keyboards / John Elstar - Harmonica
Chart Position: UK # 12 / USA # 69 / Sweden # 37

Tracklist:

01. Never Say Die
02. Johnny Blade
03. Junior's Eyes
04. A Hard Road
05. Shock Wave
06. Air Dance
07. Over To You
08. Breakout
09. Swinging The Chain

Obrázok Obrázok

Download links for all albums only on our blog here: http://goodmetalandhar.do.am/

Obrázok





Download links for all albums only on our blog here: http://goodmetalandhar.do.am/
Odkazy na stažení všech alb naleznete pouze na našem blogu zde: http://goodmetalandhar.do.am/

Návrat na "NOVINKY 1988 / NEWS 1988"

Kto je prítomný

Užívatelia prezerajúci toto fórum: Žiadny pripojení užívatelia a 3 neregistrovaní